Friday, September 18, 2009

Judgement Day - ID on trial


After viewing the first half of "Judgement Day", do you have any thoughts so far?

5 comments:

AWillingham said...

Though I obviously have very little idea how a school board functions, I was surprised that a couple of creationists who had newly joined the board felt they had a right to impose their own beliefs on the school as a whole by deciding that intelligent design was the best compromise for them. It was also surprising that these men who weren't certified educators were able to order qualified science teachers what to teach. I was disappointed that no students had been interviewed for the documentary, since they were the ones who would be affected by these changes.

Ben Levy said...

Hopefully I'm not making anyone angry or anything, but that movie really makes me kind of mad, in more than one way. First, I can't stand that people actually do not want evolution to be taught in science classes and even worse, that they think that Intelligent Design is a SUBSTITUTE for evolution. These are two totally separate subjects. Although it might sound a bit harsh, I wish that people who insist on believing the literal word of the bible could find a way to reconcile their beliefs that didn’t involve depriving kids of essential education and teaching prejudice against scientists. Additionally, I was quite angered at the school board members who resigned after the Intelligent Design ringleader won his little battle. These people, who could actually make changes happen, should stay strong instead of just giving up. This was a classic example of cutting off their nose to spite their face.

Alice Buckley said...

I think this movie is a good addition to our class, because after researching the debate for our case studies, I still didn't realize how big of a controversy it was. It is so interesting that the Dover Case, which started out as merely a suggestion for the addition of Intelligent Design in a biology class became a huge court case. Because in the end evolution, or lack there of, becomes a matter of people's morals and beliefs versus the scientific evidence.

Ben Levy said...

One more thing: it sounded from the other comment like I don't like the movie, which isn't what I meant. The argument itself is quite frustrating, but the movie presents the argument in a very interesting way.

Tatiana said...

I thought that this movie was extremely interesting but at the same time it is frustrating to see people who feel justified in suggesting that intelligent design should be taught as an alternative to evolution in a science class. The fact that one of the people in the movie said that he wouldn't approve a book for bio class because it was "laced with Darwinism" is upsetting because people like him view the concept of evolution as the enemy. I am completely fine with people having different beliefs, be it creationism, intelligent desing, or evolution/natural selection but I do not approve of people trying to impose their religious views on others through the forced teaching of intelligent design, which undoubtedly has religious connotations.
I do think, however, that it's important to watch this movie because growing up in the Bay Area can often make people sheltered to the beliefs of the rest of the country.
-Tatiana